I Survived The SATs!

The universities that I would like to go to recommended that homeschool students take a standardized test to apply ( why? ) and I chose the SAT without the essay.

 

Preparing

Taking as many practice test as you possibly can ( it sounds extreme but I think lots of practice tests are very important ) help so much! Khan Academy Official Practice made the whole test experience a lot easier. Around 2 months before the test date, I took the first full-length practice test on Khan Academy so it could see where I struggled and where I excelled to make a plan. It recommends what subjects need to be worked on based on the previous practice tests’ scores. Screenshot 2018-01-15 at 1.08.44 PM

Every day up until the test day I spent about 20 minutes – so I didn’t get overwhelmed or burnt out – working on the topics it recommended and every other week I took a full-length practice test to pretend it was the real test day. The week of the actual test I took full-length practice tests every other day because I wanted to get the nerves of the test out a bit. At some point, test scores seem to stop varying much and stick within a range. I had a 90 point range with all of the practice tests. I got around the same score every time except for a few really bad days and one really great score day. My final score ended up being right in this range and the official score had a 70 point range predicting that if I retook the test it would also fall within the same range.

Khan Academy also has lots of tips and tricks on how to take the test. In the comments on their pages, people have shared things about their experiences and lots of helpful tips, too.

 

Registering

All SAT test registration is done through the CollegeBoard. As I had said in the previous post on SATs, it is good to sign up well in advance to get a test centre close by. My uni applications all have a deadline of March 1st for getting the docs in, so this was my only chance to take the test and do well. If I were to do it again, I would take the SATs a little earlier in case my score wasn’t a good representation of my skills. But the benefit is I knew I did my very best this time and it probably wouldn’t be much better if I had taken the test again.

I didn’t do my full registration, I had my mom do it because I was afraid I would miss something. They require a photo which they seem very picky about but really as long as you can tell who you are from the picture it is fine. There is a fee for the test and it is more for those outside of the US. They also want you to fill out info forms for scholarships but those scholarships are just for the US, so I did not fill them out.

 

Test day

I had to get up at 6am, which, as a homeschooler that doesn’t usually have to wake up very early, was the worst part of the whole test, I also didn’t fall asleep until late so that didn’t help, but that’s why coffee exists! The first thing that happens when you arrive at the Test Centre is the check your ID and admission ticket. I went in before it was technically open but that also meant I was one of the first people out once the test was done. After getting ID checked, I went to the Test Room where everyone was lined up and handing in their phones to be set aside during the test, I did not take my phone with me. There was quite a bit of waiting for everyone to get in, which I didn’t really mind since it was my first time ever in a non-university classroom, I liked looking around at everything. The test supervisor handed out test booklets and workbooks, explained the rules and there was signing to agree that you weren’t cheating or anything, and then the first part of the test began. Each part passed by with breaks in between, I made the mistake of not standing up when it was break time and sitting in the chair for 4 hours got very uncomfortable. It was very nice once the test was over and the relief of it being done, and I could get out of the chair.

 

Scores

The scores were sent out about a week later. They email to tell you they have arrived and you can view them through the CollegeBoard website, where they also heavily break the scores down and explain where points came from and where you did well. I was satisfied with my score but I know I could have done better with timing. The time flies by during the actual test.

Official scores are sent to the schools you’ve applied to through the CollegeBoard for a fee to ship them. It took awhile to find the code for the schools since they’re outside of the US but with some searching around they were found. Scores were sent off and that’s it for the standardized test part of the application!

 

 

P.S It’s Peri

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8 thoughts on “I Survived The SATs!

  1. Kitty Jade Reply

    Aw! Well done, I’m glad you did well. Preparation is key and makes me feel a whole lot better. Well done again and good luck, xx Erin

    1. psitsperi Reply

      Thank you!! True preparation is everything

      1. Kitty Jade Reply

        Aww, thanks. And no problem!

  2. Alicia Reply

    Congrats!!!

    1. psitsperi Reply

      Thank you!!

  3. home/instead Reply

    How neat to read of a homeschooler in high school! We homeschool right now and it’s such a blessing to see people make it “all the way!” Blessings on your journey!

    1. psitsperi Reply

      Thank you! I’m glad you enjoy it 🙂 The goal is to try to make homeschooling through high school less of a mystery and more common! Good luck with your homeschool journey!

  4. […] the SATs. Technically I did this in December but I posted about it not that long […]... https://psitsperi.wordpress.com/2018/01/30/one-month-into-2018-what-has-been-completed

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